Thoughts from the Committee

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Thoughts from the Festival Committee

Friday night of the Festival delivered bumper crop of productions, three plays linked maybe by the trials and tribulations of being a teen, of being in a drama festival and of falling in love.

Swavesey Youth Theatre’s performance of ‘What Are They Like?’ by Lucinda Coxon took us into the minds of teens and their parents in a witty piece of physical theatre. Then Stagefright tried to present ‘The Murder of Red Riding Hood’  by Andra Bishop and her cast but this was a case of the drama festival play that went wrong, quite deliberately and very hilariously. The evening ended with BAWDS and ‘Anyone Can Dance’ another original play by Sean Baker where we explored the what-ifs and might have-beens of a close, physical, relationship in amusing and all too recognisable flashbacks.

Join us for tonight where we’ll enjoy our two final plays, followed by our Awards Ceremony where adjudicator Jennifer Scott-Reid will announce the award winners.

Tickets are available from The Mumford Theatre or on the door. We hope to see you there!


What was the third night of the Festival all about?

Well it was all about ‘Alfie’, the thoroughly un-PC 1960’s ‘likely lad’ in Huntingdon Drama Club’s extracts from the famous full length play and it was all about Meridian Theatre’s beautiful staging of Brian Friel’s ‘Afterplay’ with two touching portrayals of Chekhov characters meeting by chance in a late night cafe in 1920’s Moscow. Two plays about dreams and failures.

Join us tonight for a feast of three plays; adolescent emotions, a school play (what could possibly go wrong?) and should we dissect our love lives?

Tickets are available from The Mumford Theatre or on the door. We hope to see you there!


The second night of the Festival brought us emotion, fear and hope and inspired us deeply.

The first play ‘Graham the World’s Fastest Blind Runner’ from Samuel Ward Academy, was a beautifully performed piece of physical theatre telling a true story. Hope and inspiration then gave way to fear and loss in the WriteOn! collaborative production of ‘Pavement is my Pillow’ telling of the heartbreaking lives of those who sleep rough every night. Again two contrasting productions but both offered strong ensemble work and left our audience with a lot to think about. Good theatre should do that.

Join us again tonight for two classics of the short form play:

Tickets are available from The Mumford Theatre or on the door. We hope to see you there!


The first night of the 49th Cambridge Drama Festival brought us two contrasting dramas but they still had a common theme – ‘Waiting’.

The first, an original and touching piece (SNOWFLAKES), showcased a couple of strong youth performers and the second, a very well known play (THE DUMB WAITER), in which two highly experienced actors were very nearly upstaged by the Dumb Waiter of the title.

We hope you can join us tonight for another two plays which both promising to be inspiring.

Tickets are available from The Mumford Theatre or on the door. We hope to see you there!

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